Tag Archives: flagstaff massage

TAME THE PAIN WITH MASSAGE

Baby Your Back
TAME THE PAIN WITH MASSAGE

By Karrie Osborn

Download the story here..Baby_Your_Back

Anyone with recurring, unyielding back problems knows the beast that is called back pain. While most of us have experienced back pain that comes from overexertion or muscle pulls, the effects of back pain for many can be debilitating, excruciating, and life changing. Experts say back pain accounts for $100 billion in lost productivity and health-care costs each year and is one of the primary causes of work-related disability. Managing back pain can be a daunting and exhausting proposition. One natural avenue for finding relief is massage therapy.

Whether you’ve pulled a muscle in your yoga class or afternoon basketball game, or you suffer from long-term pain caused by an injury, back pain affects us all. In fact, when it comes to low-back pain specifically, researchers
say that 70–85 percent of the population will experience it at some point in their lives.
Unfortunately, the back pain numbers are growing. A recent study in the Archives of Internal Medicine found that the rate of chronic low-back pain has more than doubled in North Carolina since 1992 (from 3.9 percent in 1992 to 10.2 percent in 2006), a statistic the researchers say reflects what’s happening across the country.
Arizona-based massage therapist Geoffrey Bishop says approximately 95 percent of his clients come to him with some sort of back pain these days, while still other therapists report that nearly all of their massage clientele—from children to seniors to weekend warriors—experience this particular pain.

Obviously, the costs associated with back pain are also growing. According to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), Americans spend at least $50 billion each year on low-back pain alone, which is second only to headaches as the most common neurological ailment in the United States.

WHAT CAUSES THE PAIN?
Back pain is an especially debilitating condition because every movement your body makes depends on the spine functioning optimally. When back pain shows up, your whole body knows it, and sometimes exacerbates the problem by compensating in other ways to avoid the pain. It’s not unusual for sufferers to have secondary problems related to those compensation patterns.
Experts say the cause of back pain can be the result of several factors. High on the list is stress. Hunched over a keyboard, late on a deadline, bogged down in worry—many are familiar with this life. When our body is stressed, we literally begin to pull inward: the shoulders roll forward and move up to the ears, the neck disappears, and the back tightens in the new posture. “It’s an armoring effect,” says Angie Parris-Raney, a Denver-based massage therapist who specializes in deep-tissue massage and sports therapy. She says this natural response to pain can create more problems when left unchecked. “That protective mode, with the muscles in flex, can even result in visceral problems,” she says, where the pain also affects internal organs.

In addition to stress, poor posture, bad ergonomics, lack of exercise, arthritis, osteoporosis, a sedentary lifestyle, overexertion, pregnancy, kidney stones, fibromyalgia, excess weight, and more can spark back pain.
For the on-site clients Bishop sees at a manufacturing plant, the majority have some sort of back pain related to their work. While these workers have the option to sit or stand at their assembly station, Bishop says the repetitive motion they perform throughout their shift—with their arms and hands continuously extended forward—has most of them complaining of back pain. Fortunately, this employer has seen the value of massage for its employees and brought Bishop on as part of the company’s wellness program.
Bishop, who owns Stay Tuned Therapeutics in Flagstaff, says mechanics is the main cause of back pain that he sees in his practice. “It’s mechanics, including repetitive use and ignorance about preventative postures, and neglect by employers and employees to provide rest and recovery.” The past also plays a part, he says. “Old injuries and traumatic events, left untreated and unresolved, seem to dictate where stress lands in the back as well.”

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Filed under Back Pain, Flagstaff Arizona massage, Flagstaff pain relief, Forward Heads, neck pain

Flagstaff Sports Massage

Geoffrey Bishop of Flagstaff, AZ performing a few massage and movement techniques related to sports.  Geoffrey has been working in Flagstaff since 1999.  Working with athletes of all abilities, corporate America production and desk workers and anyone in between.  The focus of massage techniques at Stay Tuned Therapeutics is typically on injury prevention, and if it comes to it, rehabilitation of injury.  To book your appointment call 928-699-1999.

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Filed under Flagstaff Arizona massage, Flagstaff deep tissue massage, Flagstaff massage therapy, flagstaff sports massage, High Altitude massage, Myoskeletal Alignment, Uncategorized, Video

Upper Ribs, Shoulder Pain and Breathing Pt1

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Filed under body mechanics, Breathing, Flagstaff massage therapy, Flagstaff therapeutic massage, Myoskeletal Alignment, neck pain, pain management, shoulder pain

Dalton Webinar Night, Wed. April 21.

Join us for the fun and information.  We will be broadcasting on 8 ft screen at 6 pm, at the clinic.  403 West Birch Ave, Flagstaff, AZ. Drop me an e mail if you plan to attend.

A Special Pre-Conference Broadcast as our Gift to You: (click here to preview)

The 42 Pound Head: Fixing Funky Necks

The neck is burdened with the challenging task of supporting and moving the human head. Because of tension, trauma and poor postural habits inherent in today’s workplace, it comes as no surprise that neck disorders rank high among the most common pain generators driving people into bodywork practices. In this presentation you’ll learn how to look beyond the symptoms and treat the whole to correct dysfunctional neck posture, which is key in stopping degenerative joint disease, as well as pain from headaches, rib dysfunction, TMJ, and Dowager’s Humps.

Erik Dalton, Ph.D., shares a broad therapeutic background in massage, Rolfing® and manipulative osteopathy in his entertaining and innovative pain-management workshops, books and videos. Dalton is executive director of the Freedom From Pain Institute® and developer of the Myoskeletal Alignment Techniques®. Visit www.ErikDalton.com to read internationally published articles and subscribe to free monthly “Technique” e-newsletters

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Filed under body mechanics, Flagstaff Arizona massage, Flagstaff pain relief, neck pain, outreach

Celebrate Earth Day at Stay Tuned

Celebrate Earth Day!  Book a massage, facial, waxing, or any treatment we offer during the week of Earth Day, March 19-24th, and receive 20% off when you bring in your used electronics at appointment time to Stay Tuned Therapeutics.

Call now to book your appointment, receive the discount when you come in, it’s that simple.

Items will be donated, recycled or disposed of properly.

Treatment options.

Massage & Bodywork

Skincare/waxing/nail care.

Call Geoffrey at 928-699-1999 or Missy at 928-699-1801 for details!

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Filed under Flagstaff deep tissue massage, outreach, Uncategorized

Free the Foot, Pt 2

Bones

Boney Anatomy

Pt. 1 The technician grasps the ankle gently, inferior to the medial and lateral malleoli, tib/fib.  Applying a gentle squeeze will suffice in creating distraction of the tib/fib away from the talus.  Lifting the leg off the table, the clinician gently “whips” the foot to and fro, mobilizing the foot from the leg, via ankle movement.  As the foot is thrown away from and drawn near to the clinician, balance of supination/pronation in the calcaneus and talus may be achieved.

PT. 2. The Tarsal-metatarsal joint is the target of this hands on mobilization technique.  The technician drapes their up body hand around the arch of the foot, isolating down on the cuboid and cuneiforms.  The down body hand grasps each distal head of the metatarsals 1-5.  While holding steady the arch against the technician’s body with up body hand, the down body hand rocks, rotates and distracts each tarsal-metatarsal joint, restoring movement in this very important, first line of defense, spring mechanism.

Home retraining from Boddicker Performance.

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Filed under body mechanics, Flagstaff massage therapy, Flagstaff Running, flagstaff sports massage, Foot/Ankle, pain management

“Do” not “Try” this.

I recently had the opportunity to work with a some great personal trainers, and movement educators in their domains, the gym and personal studios.  A common thread I was made aware of seemed to be a bit of an insult, looking in on the training as a non participant.  I am wondering if this is taught, or just something that some trainers fall into?

In screening movement and reeducation, it seems to be common place to use the word “try” rather than “do”.  In performing the screening of movement function, the trainers would cleverly discover a movement pattern dysfunction: ankle flexion, hip extension, trunk rotation, rib basket expansion, etc.

Moving on to the reeducation segment of the training.  The trainers, armed with the information of dysfunctional segments of movement in the kinetic chain, would use the word “try”.  “Try to bring the hip into extension.”, “Try to feel the glute max fire as you come through this portion of extension.”  With a simple reassurance that the tissue was not firing, a sideways glance, or a slight chuckle, the trainer may now has the client in the position to become a junkie, a student, a follower.

I am curious, at which phase these trainers move into saying things like “Bring the hip into extension.” or “Feel the glute max fire as you come into extension.” with some positive verbal reinforcement and kinesthetic cueing?

I can’t recall if it was my Mom, track coach, Boy Scout leader or who at some point I heard the phrase “There is no trying, only doing.”  This phrase has been ingrained in my brain and being.  If I really want something, this is how I approach it, and I share this with my clients.  I like to see my clients succeed as quickly as possible.

I invite your feedback, please help me understand this.

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Filed under body mechanics, Flagstaff pain relief, High altitude training